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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 225 (some duplicates have been removed)
some themes last time, particular identity and relationship and religion, and i'd just like to ask you since our last class, did anyone have an incident in life, not necessarily religious, but something that brought up this idea of this fundamental nature of identity and relationship? anybody at all have an experience they want to share on that? yeah, janet? >> i went to a high school graduation of mother mccauley catholic high school this past saturday. it was very much a ritual event, and lots of prayers being said. >> did you notice what was being said though - i'm curious - what kinds of things were being said, anything that came out that you might have flashed on? >> it seemed like they were talking about - reminiscing about the past, but mostly focusing on the future, and what have we learned, and then how will we use it in our future endeavors. >> exactly. and i went to a wedding and saw the same thing - people talking about, in vows, the relationship between two people. love, i mean, you could spend a lifetime and do worse than just contemplate love, what it means in tererms of
'm standing in front of the egypt museum here. we see that certainly the earliest times in that archc religion, finding some meaning, some sense of purpose out of life that was cold and brutal created such an extraordinarily beautiful set of statues and mythic drama. a couple of questions we can follow up here in terms of main class themes. one would be the pervasiveness of religion. in the face of insecurity and death, we think once again about identity - who are these people - and relationship. how do we deal with the world around us that seems bent on our creating our own demise? our sojourn through the wide, cool halls of the egyptian museum in cairo dramatically reinforces our three interrelated introductory class themes. rites of passage - in this case death - generate boundary questions - "where do i go when i die?" which is a pervasive human preoccupation from our most ancient civilizations up to the present. if nothing else, our mortality is the commonality that binds humanity together, and forces us to formulate religious answers to the sometimes overwhelming demands of our shared ex
at the religion process. and also, we just left talking about the seeker style of religion, and that's a great leaping off point for us for looking at religious experience, which is what we're going to do in this class. but first, i know you had a lot of questions and a lot of interesting comments, and i'm particularly interested in your feedback on the religion process, how you see it holding forth. you haven't had a lot of time to think about it, but any questions or comments you'd like to make? >> before self-consciousness in man, isn't there something more primal, something innate in man that reaches out to the other, even before he becomes self-conscious about anything around him? >> give me an example. that's a good point. >> well, say, an uneducated man, that he would see the sun, and then when we looks around, and he thinks, "that's something other than what's around here; that must be something importan" >> i'm glad you brought that up, because self-consciousness is a difficult term and it may mean different things to different people. i think i'm saying something more along the line
the old constitutional role and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> for most of the nation's history with the states rather than the federal government that controlled access to the religious worship and organizations and so on. in the early decades that began to shift as the supreme court applied then national constitutional the establishment and centralizing debate about religion. >> but if the states had the control we had written to the constitution, freedom of religion. >> we did indeed the first amendment began congress shall enact no loss it was only to the national government. >> were there restrictions on different states? >> several states had religious establishments and most limited the amount of property a religious organization could owned, tax religious property, others ban given group's practices. i'm thinking for example we eventually and various states. >> when it came to massachusetts, talk about them as a case study of the state's regulating religion. it is starkly unconstitutional but in the last case was brought, the west criminal prosecu
the next musical as religion. you do have a grasp. there were things up until the very last performance i was wondering if we were pushing it. they believed themselves. tavis: what did that experience a to you about the way, i try to find the right word, view, hold, about the the notion of religion, because it is the most sacred on the one hand and then among the most controversial topics in the nation. >> it is. i am spiritual by nature. tavis: yes, you are from one of those tribes. >> yes. it is in my dna. you have seen the show. yes, it appeals to an agnostic or an atheist sensibility, but it also truly delivers a message of spirituality, and it delivers on the promise of what religion can do, right? here are these people who absolutely have no reason to have faith. they are people at their lowest. and when these missionaries, and give them something to believe in, even if it is outside of the realm of normal, even if it is a little crazy and comes from a lie, which it does, inevitably, in our story, it still gives them something to grasp. it still gives them hope. that message, i thin
. in 2011, he returned to germany and he told parliament that religion had lost its meaning for many people. the most recent controversy was the saw the pointing to corruption in the highest echelon of the church. >> all three monotheistic religions go back to the same origin with abraham being a father. nevertheless, relations between judaism, islam, and christianity remain strained. there have been raise of hope and moments of reconciliation. in our next report, we look at relations during the popsy of pope benedict -- papacy of benedict xvi. >> his speech was meant to be clear signal of improved relations. >> shalom. i would like to take this opportunity to assure you that i intend to continue with all my strength toward improved relations with the jewish people. that is the path on which john paul ii took great steps. >> years later, he visited auschwitz. but this was just one side of a tricky balancing act. his actions within the church causing doubts about his commitment to the friendship. in 2007, benedict revived the mass that satisfied a conservative catholics, but it includes the
that it is an attack on their religion? >> i'm not affecting their religion. it is their religion, not mine. as i see it, i always learn from my parents that god is love. that is the only thing i do -- i love my partner and i love my children. what is wrong with that? >> and you are also religious? >> yes, we are. >> you are religious. within your church, has there been an acceptance that you did not expect or not acceptance? how has that operated within your church? >> that are fun of it. it is not a problem at all. it is not an issue, although, for us, it is not possible to get married in church at the moment. it is not an issue that we are lesbians and having kids and have a legal marriage. >> thank you very much for joining us. >> the excesses' of large banks before the global economic meltdown have been well documented, but this week, the light was turned on to a particularly touchy practice known as the libor fixing scandal and a worryingly unregulated system where banks were able to fix lending rates in a way that could benefit them financially. this week, the royal bank of scotland was fined
in extreme poverty. their lives governed by religion and caste. many women never even report an assault, due to the social stigma. we are looking for the woman that the minister is accused of raping. "how do i know" says a neighbor. against a wall of silence. they seem almost too scared to tell us where she is. one person asks who will save them if they go against the establishment. >> these charges. an attempt to murder. >> this man says he tried to go against the establishment. he accused his local minister of trying to kill him after he challenged him in an election. he says this shows this. >> i am a conman. he was a politician. the police never would have had a case against him. >> but there has been no movement in the case so far, like so many in the overloaded indian justice system. we are on our way now to the minister accused of trying to kill his rival. it is not just attempted murder he is charged with, but many other crimes, too, including robbery and kidnapping. this man has won four elections here, and he has been in power 15 years. we pay him a surprise visit and five him surr
religion. there is no intrinsically religious purpose in providing disaster assistance. this provision simply recognizes that houses of worship are one aspect of community recovery. this bill helps ensure that our communities fully recover physically, emotionally, and mentally after a disaster. i urge my colleagues to join in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from west virginia reserves. the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized. mr. barletta: i wish to yield seven minutes to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. smith, who is the sponsor of this bill. mr. smith: i thank my good friend for yielding. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized for seven minutes. mr. smith: and for mr. rahall. i want to thank gracie for her co-sponsorship and leadership on this important bill. and all the co-sponsors and to our leadership for scheduling it for a vote today. this is extremely important and very timely. madam speaker, superstorm sandy inflicted unprecedented damage on communities in the northeast, inc
she adored but who opposed both marriage and religion. then she learned she was pregnant again, and that changed everything. dorothy day converted to catholicism at the age of 30 and was baptized in this church near her home in staten island. she turned to god, she said, in gratitude and joy over the birth of her only child. she broke off with the baby's father and raised her daughter alone, still working as a journalist but searching for a way to connect her social values to her deepening faith. the answer was to start "the catholic worker," a newspaper priced at a penny that's still published today, and that provided funds for a growing movement to help the poor. >> if your broth is hungry, yofeed him. you don't meet him at the door and say, "go be thou filled," or "wait for a few weeks, and you'll get a welfare check." you sit him down and feed him. and so that's how the soup kitchen started. >> reporter: jane sammon joined the catholic worker movement near the end of day's life. >> here was a group of people who really, really were talking issues about the poor, but they we
parents like that. very modern. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but bea
. >> it is a surprise but also, i guess, a big challenge because use live the pope, according to the catholic religion, he is effectively god's representative on earth. not the sort of job you resign from. if you remember, " john paul ii the died in 2005, the predecessor, it was a very long illness and it was obvious to everyone the pope was not well. but the vatican has a way of keeping things going, keeping up assad going, at least, up until the pope passes on and then a new one is elected. his is a very strange situation. unknown situation. my vatican sources are telling me that it is probably not going to be the same procedure that would have happened had hoped benedick died. using that is followed by a mourning period and then a conclave, calling to run the princes of the church, 100 or so carnots that represent the catholic church from the world. a sealed themselves and decided to should be elected. the conclave obviously will have to happen regardless. we will not have a mourning period because the pope has not passed away. very interesting. we have the date of the resignation, february 28. i t
about books. >> what role does religion play? it seems to be important in who is going to have children and who is not, but it's in the sense of belief that in attendance the church services or other participation. can you talk about that a little bit? >> it is a fascinating subject because it has changed. if you go back and look at the national statistics report the demographers back then looked at the catholics and protestants and as it happens. over the years conflict fertility increase and demographers said this was the end of catholic fertility. they were no longer special but instead something much more interesting happened. it no longer mattered what your actual belief was to the matter if you were jewish or more men are catholic or protestant. all the matter is how often you attended your services and so there's a straight line between the increased fertility etc. so if you go once every two months your fertility is higher than if you go not at all and if you go once a month it is higher still. if you go once a week it is higher still and not only that but your ideal fertility.
. many say the church is on a slope to being a third world religion and it's looking to many like the next pontiff will come from latin america or africa. i'd like to see a progressive american become pope and usher this church into the 20th 20th century or maybe the 18th or 19th centuries. if you travel this country and visit churches, as i do, you'll see older congregations and a priest who is not from america more often than not. something that to be done if they want to save this church. i could talk all night about the fact that the c. >> jennifer:celibacy rule is antiquated. it's the man made hang ups of an unauthorized fan club getting in the way of a lot of people. the facebook one religious group in our people are people raised religious and feel spiritual but let down by american religion. >> 24% identify with religion today that they were raised in. i want to ask you about money and the church. i'm going to get skeptical on you. how big a driving force is the ability for a european pope or to a degree an american pope to raise money for the church, where they would avoi
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
, religion and population aging. we'll get to all of those during the next hour. but first, why don't you answer for me the question that ever reporters asked by his or her editor and reporter purchase of purchased with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> and matters because fertility rates and demographics or what my friend phil long in town here at the new america foundation says it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth. demography isn't quite dead to me, but it's close. .. are we talking about a year, a few years, a decade, centuries, where is it happening? >> host: so the phenomena has begun in the west, it began around 1970. to back up quickly. the way we measure this is by simple birth statistics. it's not terribly difficult to do. when you have well organized societies to keep track of them you know how many people are born and their ages and their parent's ages. they calculate the birthrate, the general fertility rate and a total fertility rate. it's not a real number, in the sense that it's a hard and fast number. it's a statistical constru
, that the religion is what it is, and you live by the rules because that's what the faith is about. what is faith? what is the church? what should be the right rules? and maybe the expedience of the moments, if we just adjust to the times, you se some sense of what the faith is at its core. that's certainly the orthodox position. on the other hand, you've got lots of catholics from my generation who want to see it be more exclusive and sclus inclus inviting, and would want that from the pope. >> especially when it comes to birth control. mary ann walsh sort of pooh-poohed that, but it is very important to catholic women. almost 90% of catholic women have taken birth control at some point in their lives. >> and there are no women priests or women in positions of power, not to denegrate in any way the nuns and the amazing influence they had on many lives, including mine as a catholic student. but this pope himself, very interesting, called the rottweiler of god, so strict to orthodoxy, he got into a point of confusion, right, because when he was talking about africa, the first time that they talked
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
? privately and romantically and joyfully? >> but food is the basis of a lot of ethnic 'tisty and religion. we have a saying here on friday and it goes back to southern baptist churches. when the service is almost over, it's on with chicken. >> it's on with chicken. >> leaving on sunday, you are going to go eat gran ma's home fried chicken >> i want to giver people a religious experience of food. the word religion means from a latin verb to bind together, to hold everything together. >>> i'm a religious ravens fan. if people have a religious experience of food, especially couples, i'm not talking about denomination. i'm talking about an experience that binds them together and food is a great vehicle for that. . we'll take it to a break. sheer's sharon in traffic control. join us as cbs baltimore. com. "spicing up married life" okay, i need a better pizza. one made with only real cheese. a pizza my family will love. (announcer) freschetta naturally rising crust pizza. freschetta. made better to taste better. >>> 5 1/2 before 7:00. >> >> let's go to
"talibanistan: negotiating the borders between terror, politics and religion" which expores the threat posed by extremist who operate in the border area between afghanistan and pakistan. this is about an hour and a half. ♪ good morning. good afternoon, everybody. welcome. i'm steve cool i'm the president of new america foundation. it's my pleasure to welcome do you to the event briefly and introduce our subject, which from our perspective involves the launch of the book that somebody will hold up for the audience. since i don't have a copy. "talibanistan." i just wanted to say a few words about where this book came from and why the subject matter. you'll hear discussed today struck us as worthy of what became really a couple of years of endeavor at new america lead by peter bergen who will be the host and moderator through most of the program today. peter and katherine who is not here with us today. coed ditted this book from the oxford university press. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and the environment in southern afghanistan and western pakist
and snake in the garden. all of the world's first religions were -- the first stories were turned on the question of aging and death and can we stop it and i think those questions are as deep for us as they ever were. we are more technically sophisticated so it's very likely that these questions are going to become less and less satisfaction and present concern over the next years. >> professor of medical and scientific journalism here at columbia university. he won a pulitzer prize for the book. was the book about? >> that's out evolution. i have a place i have to say thank you because it's one of the most extraordinary stories i ever ran across. two pilot adjusts. every year -- they've been doing this since 1973 the cantelon and little desert that he himself never saw. they watched darwin and a documented in evolution by natural selection proceeding year by year. they've watched it. they've seen it. they understand today they are doing what he never imagined possible. he thought it would take the geological ages to see the evolution in but now i'm seeing more and it turns out we
cathedral, he renewed respect for his argument that religion should stay at the heart of public life. over the last few years, catholicism has grown in the developing world. in its birthplace of europe, he has found the tides of secularism, all but impossible to stem. the pope defended moslems by quoting historical criticisms of it is lomb. -- islam. he has faced criticism over the handling of the sexual abuse crisis. he has been accused of doing too little to prevent abuse by priests. >> there is a suspicion that they were being shielded by j.p. ii rather than by him. >> he hoped he could build up a struggle church, but in seven years, there was little that he could do. >> for more on what this means, i enjoined by the professor at the catholic university of america. thank you for coming in. were you surprised by this announcement? >> in one sense, yes, because popes do not do this. in another sense, no. pope benedict is a very humble man and realistic man. the job requires energies of mind and body that he no longer has. he has felt free to step down. it is the end of an era, it is the b
there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to sleep during the coldest and rainiest nights of the year. it's been this mayor and his predecessors who look to what happened at hurricane katrina, saw the key role that congregation leaders, facilities and congre gants can play at the time of a diseafert disaster and called us to stakeholders and mayor lee invi
ritu santo . >> se piensa que todo sea espiritual . >> thomas, profesor de religion de la universidad de stanford dice que no tiene nada de espiritual ,la mayoría fueron nombrados por el papa benedicto xvi y juan pablo ii, garantiza son conservaodres y por eso es que la tendencia no es por diferencias sicologicas, teologicas, sino más bien territoriales . >> por ejemplo los italianos quieren regresar y tomar el papado porque no lo han tenido hace cuarenta años, algo así . >> y los italianos son poderosos, de 177 cardenales que eligiran al papa, 21 son italianos. >> que es el actual secretario, yo creo que él tiene la clave del proceso porque en los últimos cinco años han nombrado, ha transformado el colegio y ha nombrado principalmente obispos europeos . >> una cosa es segura, el nuevo papa ser aparecido al anterior . >> sin duda será conservador . >> algunos observadores creen que otro papa conservador es lo que menos neceista la iglesia en el siglo xxi, especialmente cuando ahora están desconectados de las decisiones del vaticano, la ddecision está en el colegio del vaticano
seeing these new attacks on the religion in the former soviet union. >> since 22 years ago, things changed again. the spiritual landscape, the political landscape, economy, is changing drastically in all of those countries. the countries that once were freed from the oppression of the soviet union. and in those countries and central asia, like uzbekistan, where radical islam is coming into more effective -- in many cases, oppression. >> wendy: how is the church responding? >> as we're talking today, wendy, churches are responding tremendously. under persecution. pastors are thrown to prisons, bibles are confiscated, and bibles are destroyed in uzbekistan, but we see the house churches are growing by every day. so the church is growing tremendously underground. >> wendy: is the increase in religious persecution coming from the russian government? >> you know, there is a constitution that is telling us there is separation between church and government. so based on all of this political development, or religious political developments, the evangelical church is very much in the minori
are a school, so we teach the art of gospel music. so it doesn't matter what religion you are. but i think that gospel music was birthed out of a need to be spiritual or to be religious or to have hope and possibility and joy in your life, you know, especially during those really difficult times. and it sort of takes us through a journey of our life in america, you know, whether you go from traditional gospel songs or slave songs or folk songs. >> vy explained that one of the goals of the program is to keep the spirit of gospel alive. >> as we auditioned people for events, we find out that they were not able to sing a whole gospel song all the way through. so, therefore, we felt that it was important now to make sure that we infuse these young people with the history and culture and let them know who they are and where they come from musically so that they would be able to pass the music on for generation and generation to come. >> by the end of the audition, these teens are already learning to let their light shine. >> ♪ let it shine, let it shine, let it shi-i-i-i-ne ♪ [ cheers and a
muslims, more problems. >> yeah, because their religion requires them to wage jihad. if you are a muslim, up better be out there jihadding away. >> which explains all the wars we've had with ms. lums in indonesia, india and dearborn, michigan. clearly we need new tanks or new money but don't worry the army has a great way of raising some. >> one of the ways that we kept equipment costs down is we sell it to our friends. the saudis, kuwaities, egyptians. >> waiting we're selling our bad ass tanks to muslims? our general military issues and affairs expert is going to flip. >> selling our tanks to saudi arabia is not a likely scenario. >> just so you we are selling our tanks. >> we are? >> that's right. >> i don't -- i haven't followed that aspect of the story. if we're selling tanks to saudi arabiaans, good. they are our allies in some respects. >> some respects, not good enough. i gotta get rid of these tanks before our jihadi frenive enemies get ahold of them. >> we have tanks. at big al's tank em poreium. they are do it all. of course, getting traffic! [laughter] we'll not be undersold
law, no religious denomination, no place of worship, no clergymen or equivalent in other religions will be forced by legal action in the chorus or the community to carry out weddings without their wishes? >> the honorable judge gimenez preempted the later parts of my contribution, but i can say to him was taken seriously all the points he's raised about the need for protection and he will see in some detail on the bill heller put them into place. >> i think by right honorable fred. written to honorable members on the issue of equality between same-sex and different sex individuals. the issues of consummation and adultery, while they will continue to be important aspects, they will not apply to marriage. they are both equal and should be a lifelong union. >> my honorable friend will know already there's no legal requirements to consummation, their provisions will mean ochiltree stays in couples will have the opportunity to decide on reasonable good behavior as many do already and issues he raises adults and not way. perhaps we can make more progress because there's no single view fr
, and i just sort of eyes studied philosophy and religion and world literature and history in pretty much the humanities. so when i started the business i have no background in economics or business or anything that i knew that i was going to have really low prices and i was going to pay really well and i was going to be a different kind of business because it wasn't going to be like those other businesses. and of course once you get into the real world you have to give the payroll and you have to pay your bills and your undercapitalized, your philosophy of business evolves. it was very interesting to me because a lot of my friends from the co-op saw me as a traitor that i had become -- on over to the dark side and yet the business was struggling. we managed to lose 50% of our capital in the first year. we started with $45,000 and lost 23,000. my girlfriend at the time who cofounded the business with me we were living in a store in the third floor and making $200 a month each. way below minimum wage even back then. so i began to move away from that philosophy and as i was trying to figure
, ideology, and even religion -- but today, we come together in the spirit of jesus who told us to love one another, treat others as we would want to be treated, and to love god with all our heart, soul, and strength. it would be a better world did we just listened to him. >> as you look around the world, understand your sharing this meal with people from more than 160 countries. all 50 states, presidents, heads of state, leaders of all kinds -- through prayer, we believe god has brought us together for a reason. as you listen, try to figure out what god is saying to you. >> as you heard, this event is hosted by members of the house and senate. i would like to ask all the members of the house and senate to stand at this time. [applause] we are also honored to be joined by two prime ministers, the prime minister of serbia, his excellency, and the prime minister of the democratic republic of congo, his excellency. thank you so much for being here with us. [applause] >> now i would like to introduce the head table that will lead us through this experience. i will start on my right. today, you
question. i'm tackling that tough topic of sex and religion. >> wow. >> in today's ask allison. i'm doing it! >> wow. all right. plus, virginia's newest multimillionaires say they won't let wealth change them, except for one bigupgrade. first, good morning holly. >> reporter: there she is, princess tiana on the ice. some of the many disney characters that are in town now for disney on ice treasure trove at the verizon center where we are live and coming up live we're going to get a behind the scenes look at how they bring this all together so they can deliver the magic to you and your family. stay with us for that. >> can't wait, holly. check it out. 9:21now before we take you to break. beyonce fans, tickets to her july 30th d.c. show go on sale in about 40 minutes or so. tony! >> i'm already trying. i'm already trying. >> act fast, tony. all of you, too. tickets to the first show sold out in less than a minute when they went on sale monday. >> come on, pick up. >> we're not going, folks. be right back.  >>> a fredericksburg man and his wife were likely smiling through their 80-mil
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 225 (some duplicates have been removed)